Our mission

Are you that special person who - weary from trudging the endless superhighways - just longs to camp next to a glorious oasis of the mind? Do you desire to explore new frontiers, splash in shared ideas, fill your belly with the refreshing fruits of inspiration, and bask in the gentle rays of fond reflection?

Well, you can fuck right off. This, my friends, is not that place. This place is... The ShadowLands.

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

And then there's the laundry bills...


The Australian Fair Pay Commission has decided not to increase Australia's minimum wage in case it exacerbates unemployment.

Sounds like no biggie to us when there are so many more blatant issues of wage inequality out there in the world.

Take, for example, the Wimbledon Tennis Championships.

Apart from a hard fought final, Roger Federer pretty much breezed through the Championships this year to take the winners' cheque of £850,000. However, in achieving this, it took him 15 hours and 45 minutes of hard slog out on the court. This works out at £53968 an hour.

Serena Williams, by comparison, also pocketed the 850,000 quid but only had to play for 8 hours and 48 minutes - £97,142 per hour on the court.

For the runners up, Roddick battled for over 17 hours for his £425,000 - a measly £25,000 an hour compared to the lah-de-dah Venus Williams who scarcely needed to get out of bed for less than 7 hours of play at a pay rate of more than £60,000 an hour. On an hourly rate, Venus earnt more than Roger, but she came second.

Women play much less tennis than men because their games are the best of three sets instead of five. Traditionally, this was because women were thought to have a more sensitive constitution and should not be put through the rigours of long competition.

What it has ended up meaning in the modern era is that women tennis players are all about power rather than skill or stamina. Some of them have evolved to look like they could make an easy transition to the World Wrestling Federation should they ever so choose.

But in the meantime, take just a moment to think of the poor tennis players like Federer and Roddick - carrying the burden of providing all the television content, limping from town to town, smiling for the cameras, but all the time trying to make ends meet at an hourly pay rate of only around half of their female counterparts.

No comments: